Sindh CM orders vaccination of cattle against Lumpy skin disease

Butchers deny animals were infected

Sindh Chief Minister Murad Ali Shah Friday ordered livestock authorities to vaccinate all the cattle including cows and buffaloes in the province after the Lumpy skin disease outbreak in Karachi.

Lumpy skin disease has affected a large number of animals at several cattle farms in Karachi. It was first reported in Hyderabad three months ago.

Sindh CM took notice and instructed the authorities to provide vaccine for all cattle. He has summoned a detailed report from the livestock department.

However, no vaccine is available in Pakistan at the moment.

Sindh Livestock Director-General Dr Nazeer Kolhoro has said this is the first outbreak in Pakistan. “We don’t have vaccines as it was never reported before,” he added.

The livestock department has requested the federal government to import the vaccine on an emergency basis, he said.

While speaking on SAMAA TV's morning show Naya Din, Mr Kolhoro said symptoms of lumpy skin disease have been observed in animals at several cattle markets, the task force teams have collected the samples, and an initial provincial report has been sent to Islamabad.

He has confirmed lumpy skin disease originated by Capripoxvirus but said they have no authority to declare this as a disease.

This is the responsibility of the National Veterinary Laboratory to declare the lumpy skin disease on a national level. The national laboratory is conducting research on their samples and it is expected to issue a report tomorrow (Saturday), he added.

Most cows and buffaloes are of the exotic breeds in Karachi, so they have a weak immune system while local breeds have strong immune systems, Dg livestock explained.

He said all those were rumors that hundreds of cows are being reported to have Lumpy Skin disease and have died.

Karachi Commissioner Iqbal Memon also took notice of the reports of the disease spreading in the city's cattle farms and summoned a report from Deputy Commissioner Malir.

The department has also directed livestock authorities to investigate the matter and take immediate action.

On the other hand, Private Livestock Consultant Dr Zaid, has shared the number of cases according to his forum. On Thursday over 1500 to 1600 cases appeared and 21 animal succumbed to the disease. One case was reported from Kot DG and three cows died of the disease, he said

He said after the outbreak vaccination has nothing to do with it. The government should run preventive therapy because the immunity is low in animals so if they want to boost they should ask for a light muted vaccine.

Butchers and slaughterhouses deny the disease in their animals

Meanwhile, butchers and slaughterhouses have denied the disease in their animals. "There is no such disease in our animals and we will not sell such meat, the disease is not found in day-to-day animals but inexpensive or heavy animals raised on farms."

"All are rumours, just recite Bismillah and have the meat."

What is lumpy skin disease

Originally found in Africa, lumpy skin disease, a viral infection of cattle, has a 5% mortality ratio.

It is transmitted by blood-feeding insects. It causes fever, nodules on the skin and can also lead to death, especially in animals that have not previously been exposed to the virus.

Livestock expert, Dr Zaid Khan, has said that even the milk of the infected buffalo can spread the disease to the calf.

Talking to SAMAA TV’s Mudassir Nazir, Dr Zaid said the body of the infected animal starts swelling and nodules become visible on the whole body within three days.

“The virus transmits from animal to animal through breathing and shared food,” he added. The bird can also be the carrier.

He said that high number of death can be caused because of the wrong treatment. “The infection can never be treated with anti-biotic as its incubation period is 5 to 15 days,” he added.

Dr Zaid urged farmers to isolate the infected animals and have separate labour for feeding.

Karachi

Lumpy Skin Disease

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